Archive for University of Nebraska Press

5/22 Lea Graham, Mark Spitzer, & friends @ White Whale Bookstore

Posted in Events, New Releases with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 14, 2019 by 6GPress

7 PM Wednesday, May 22…

Lea Graham & Mark Spitzer return to White Whale Bookstore w/ new books, joined by locals Anna Eidolon, Shawn Maddey, John Thomas Menesini, Daniel Parme, Jess Simms, & Robert Walicki.

FREE & BYOB, per White Whale policy. Possible vegan or pescetarian snacks, crackers guaranteed.

Here’s a bit about Lea’s book, From the Hotel Vernon, from Salmon Poetry.

The poems in this book grow out and around the Hotel Vernon, built at the turn of the 20th century in Worcester, Massachusetts. Once an elegant place for local politicians to make their backdoor deals at the edge of the city, it slowly fell into decline each decade following Prohibition. Despite this, it has always been a space where artists, newspapermen and neighbors gathered at the bar or, after the late 1940s, in its Ship Room, a room purportedly modeled after the second berth of the Mayflower. In its barroom is a 1940s mural of “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” painted by the owner’s son-in-law bartender and his friends, including the cartoonist, Al Capp.
In these poems, oral histories are poised between and among flagrant sexuality, humor and abject poverty.  Patsy Cline, Babe Ruth, WWI’s “Sacrifice Division” and Roy Orbison inhabit this space alongside the local residents: the Baker, Maurie, Charlie and Stosh.  Names of neighborhood places—Rizutti’s Goodnight Café, The Nines, The Greyhound—are recited as both proof and pride in a neighborhood that was diminished through the National Interstate and Defense Highways Act, cutting off foot traffic to local businesses by 1970.

& here’s a bit about Mark’s book, In Search of Monster Fish: Angling for a More Sustainable Planet, from University of Nebraska Press.

In Search of Monster Fish is an action-packed, knee-slapping ride into and out of the belly of the beast. Join extreme angler Mark Spitzer as he encounters man-eating catfish, ruthless barracuda, lacerating conger eels, berserk tarpon, and blood-curdling sharks in locales as exotic as the Amazon, Catalonia, the Dominican Republic, Senegal, and even in our own backyards.

But this eco-odyssey isn’t just about meeting and releasing some of the most grotesque lunkers in the world. It’s about implementing solutions for problems as behemoth as global warming and issues as common as choosing what to eat for dinner. And as the ice caps melt at the rate of 1 percent annually, Spitzer battles his most epic goliath: a leviathan that dwells in the depths of us all, making us ask who the real monsters are, what our responsibilities truly are, and what we can possibly do to sustain our planet and ourselves when faced with such demonic disenlightenment. Spitzer then beats this whopper into submission by reframing his call to action and finding his own way. A new portal to the underworld has been opened in the cutting-edge literature of monster fish, and this is your entry ticket.

BIOLOGICAL DATA

Originally from Brooklyn, Anna Eidolon moved to Pittsburgh in 2015. Her poetry and prose have appeared in The Village Voice, In Our Own Words, Resister, Spinning, and Edges. Most recently, she was the recipient of the Into the Light writing prize at Chatham University. She may ask you for a cigarette.

Lea Graham is a writer, translator and professor who lives in Rosendale, New York and Mayflower, Arkansas. She was born in Memphis, Tennessee and grew up in Northwest Arkansas. She has lived in Joplin, Missouri; Perth Amboy, New Jersey; Chicago, Illinois; Worcester, Massachusetts; Santiago, Dominican Republic; San Jose, Costa Rica; Florence, Italy and Quito, Ecuador. She earned her B.A. in English from Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri and her M.A. and Ph.D. in English/Creative Writing from the University of Illinois-Chicago. She is Associate Professor of English at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York where she has been on faculty since 2007.
Graham is the author of the poetry collection, Hough & Helix & Where & Here & You, You, You (No Tell Books, 2011), along with three chapbooks, Spell to Spell (above/ground Press, 2018), This End of the World: Notes to Robert Kroetsch (Apt. 9 Press, 2016) and Calendar Girls (above/ground Press, 2006).
Her poems, reviews, essays and translations have appeared in numerous journals and anthologies that include 3Elements Review, Politics/Letters, Crab Creek Review, Bateau, Poor Yorick, Milk, The Southern Humanities Review, Reflecting Pool: Poets and the Creative Process (Codhill Press, 2018) and The Southern Poetry Anthology VI: Tennessee, Vol. 6 (Texas Review Press, 2013).
In 2018 she won the Literal Latte’ Poetry Contest.

Shawn Maddey doesn’t have a bio anymore. No one needs to know anything about him.

John Thomas Menesini is fluffing his bio or cranking out new poems, hopefully. He is the author of The Last Great Glass Meat Million, e pit ap h, endo: Poems & Sketches 2007-2011, & Gloom Hearts & Opioids. You know Johnny.

Daniel Parme is the author of Hungry, a novel about cannibals in Pittsburgh, and Confluence, a novel about noncannibals in Pittsburgh. Post, a novella about noncannibals not in Pittsburgh, is forthcoming from Running Wild Press. For years, he slung the suds at various local sudseries; currently, he oversees the suds-slinging at a proper drinking and dining establishment.

Jess Simms is a freelance ghostwriter and fiction writer. She’s an editor with the After Happy Hour Review and has had a handful of stories published in literary journals, with recent publications including the Oakland Review, Bardic Tales and Sage Advice, and Rind Literary Magazine.

Mark Spitzer is an associate professor of writing at the University of Central Arkansas. He is the author of more than twenty-five books, including Season of the Gar: Adventures in Pursuit of America’s Most Misunderstood Fish and Beautifully Grotesque Fish of the American West (Nebraska, 2017). Spitzer has consulted for Nat Geo’s Monster Fish and appeared on Animal Planet’s River Monsters.

Robert Walicki’s work has appeared in over 50 journals, including Pittsburgh City Paper, Fourth River, Stone Highway Review, and Red River Review. A Pushcart and a Best of The Net nominee, Robert has published two chapbooks: A Room Full of Trees (Red Bird Chapbooks, 2014) and The Almost Sound of Snow Falling (Night Ballet Press), which was nominated to the 2016 List of Books for New York City’s Poets House. His first full-length collection, Black Angels, is now available from Pittsburgh’s Six Gallery Press.