Archive for White Whale Bookstore

8/23 Sheila Squillante, Scott Silsbe, Bob Pajich, & Mike Good @ White Whale

Posted in Events with tags , , , , on August 23, 2018 by 6GPress

7PM TONIGHT…

A READING! Author bios:

Sheila Squillante is the author of the poetry collection, Beautiful Nerve (Civil Coping Mechanisms, 2016), and three chapbooks of poetry: In This Dream of My Father (Seven Kitchens, 2014), Women Who Pawn Their Jewelry (Finishing Line, 2012) and A Woman Traces the Shoreline (Dancing Girl, 2011). She is also co-author, along with Sandra L. Faulkner, of the writing craft book, Writing the Personal: Getting Your Stories Onto the Page (Sense Publishers, 2015). Recent work has appeared or will appear in places like Copper Nickel, North Dakota Quarterly, Indiana Review, Waxwing, Menacing Hedge and River Teeth. She teaches in the MFA program in creative writing at Chatham University, where she edits The Fourth River, a journal of nature and place-based writing. From her dining room table, she edits the blog at Barrelhouse. She lives in Pittsburgh, PA, with her husband, Paul Bilger, a philosopher and experimental photographer, and their children.

Scott Silsbe was born in Detroit. He now lives in Pittsburgh. His poems have appeared in numerous periodicals and have been collected in the books: ‘Unattended Fire’ (2012), ‘The River Underneath the City’ (2013), and ‘Muskrat Friday Dinner’ (2017). His next book will be called ‘Mount Trashmore.’ He is also an assistant editor at Low Ghost Press.

Bob Pajich is a writer living in Forest Hills. His poetry collection, “The Trolleyman,” is available from Pittsburgh’s Low Ghost Press.

Mike Good’s recent poetry and book reviews can be found in or are soon to appear at The Adroit Journal, december, Denver Quarterly, Forklift, OH, The Georgia Review, Pleiades, Rattle, Salamander, Spillway, Sugar House Review, Tupelo Quarterly, and elsewhere. The recipient of an emerging writer scholarship from The Sun, Mike holds an M.F.A. from Hollins University and is the managing editor of Autumn House Press.

5/2 Dorsey, Matthews, Giordano, & Baldinger @ White Whale

Posted in Events with tags , , , , on May 1, 2018 by 6GPress

7PM WEDNESDAY…

Former Pittsburgher John Dorsey will be back in town for a reading Wednesday May 2, he’ll be bringing roving wordsmith Chigger Matthew along. Locals Kat Giordano and Jason Baldinger fill out the bill. This event is free, but we will be passing the hat to assist our travelers with gas money or other assorted sundries. Bio’s to follow, if you read those things.

John Dorsey has been writing poetry since the late 1980’s and has been involved in the publishing community for more than two decades. He is the author of around 50 books and chapbooks, a few of the most recent being Being the Fire (Tangerine Press, 2016) and Shoot the Messenger (Red Flag Press, 2017), the latter was funded by Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s English Department. A nine-time Pushcart Prize nominee, his work has appeared more than 2,000 magazines and anthologies from around the world. He has read or spoken at colleges and universities such as the University of Toledo, Assumption College, Cleveland State University, Seton Hill University, University of the Arts, Erie Community College, Southeast Missouri State University, and Indiana University of Pennsylvania, as well as other assorted venues covering 49 states. For several years Dorsey served as a judge for the Arts Commission of Greater Toledo’s Art in Tarta Project, which chose poems to be presented on city transit buses. In 2006, he won the Toledo City Paper’s annual poetry and fiction competition, and would go on to serve as a judge the following year, before being named the city’s Best Literary Artist in their 2014 reader poll. In 2010, he also served as a judge for Grievous Jones Press’ Grievous Prize issued in Cardiff, Wales, and in 2013 for the Standing Rock Cultural Arts Open Chapbook Competition in Kent, Ohio. From 2003-2012, he served as an Artist-in-Residence at the Collingwood Arts Center in Toledo, Ohio and In 2015, Dorsey was awarded a Visiting Artist Residency by the Osage Arts Community in Belle, MO, where he currently resides. In 2017 he received a two appointment to serve as Belle’s first city Poet Laureate from Mayor Steve Vogt and has gone on to found the city’s first literary publication the Gasconade Review, which he edits with Jason Ryberg. He is a graduate of the University of Arts’ Writing for Film and Television program, completing his education there in 2002, and 2017 he served as the subject for a poetry documentary by NYC filmmaker Carson Parish. He may be reached at archerevans@yahoo.com

Chigger Matthews is a language artist living in the American Midwest. Hosts the collaborative feature “Free Chigger Matthews Presents,” teaches poetry workshops for all ages, and is an artist-in-residence at Osage Arts Community in Belle, MO. He is the chief editor for The Artifact, Planet Earth’s First Global Poetry Newspaper and his work appears at home and abroad.

Jason Baldinger is a poet hailing from Pittsburgh. He’s the author of several books the most recent of which, the chaplet, Fumbles Revelations (Grackle and Crow) is available now, and the collection Fragments of a Rainy Season (Six Gallery Press) which is coming spring 2018. Recent publications include the Low Ghost Anthology Unconditional Surrender, The Dope Fiend Daily, Uppagus, Lilliput Review, Rusty Truck, Dirtbag Review, In Between Hangovers, Your One Phone Call, Winedrunk Sidewalk, Anti-Heroin Chic, Nerve Cowboy Concrete Meat Press, Zombie Logic Press, Ramingo’s Porch, Blue Mountain Review, Red Fez and Heartland! Poetry of Love, Solidarity and Resistance. You can hear Jason read some poems on recent and forthcoming releases by Theremonster and Sub Pop Recording artist The Gotobeds as well as at jasonbaldinger.bandcamp.com

Kat Giordano is a poet and massive crybaby in Pittsburgh, PA. Her poems have appeared in Maudlin House, OCCULUM, Indigent Press, The Cincinnati Review, and others. They have also been known to show up trembling on people’s doorsteps in the middle of the night, too traumatized to explain what they’ve seen. She is one of two editors of Philosophical Idiot and can usually be found overindulging in her shoddy mental health on Twitter at @giordkat or occasionally at katgiordano.com. Her debut full-length collection, The Poet Confronts Bukowski’s Ghost, is due out in June 2018.

4/18 Shot Outta Hoboken: Danny Shot, Lou Ickes, The Dirty Poet, & Karen Lillis @ White Whale + Open Mic feat. Jason Baldinger @ Poetic Underground

Posted in Events with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 7, 2018 by 6GPress

Karen Lillis says,

Dear friends & comrades,

I’m excited to announce a Pittsburgh book release party for DANNY SHOT, the coolest poet you haven’t heard of. I’ll be reading with him, and Lou Ickes & The Dirty Poet will be reading, too.

I first “met” Danny Shot by US mail when he accepted some of my poems for his legendary Hoboken literary mag, Long Shot. Founded by Danny Shot & Eliot Katz, Long Shot had a motto of “Writing for the Real World,” was originally funded by Allen Ginsberg, and ran for 26 issues over 20+ years.

Danny’s new book of poems, WORKS, is just out from CavanKerry Press, and like Long Shot, his poems are rooted in New Jersey, view the world through working-class bohemian eyes, pay homage to the Beats, and avoid pretension.

Read a poem by Danny Shot here:

http://livemag.org/issue_12/shot.html

..or here:

http://www.everseradio.com/write-great-jersey-poem-danny-shot/

Read more about Long Shot:
‘You Should Never Have Opened That Door’: The story of Long Shot Magazine:
http://jacket2.org/commentary/you-should-never-have-opened-door-story-long-shot-magazine

I hope you can come out and help me celebrate Danny’s book & his poetry!

SHOT OUTTA HOBOKEN

Readers: Danny Shot

Lou Ickes

The Dirty Poet

Karen Lillis

Wednesday, April 18

White Whale Bookstore

7-9pm

Free

In related news, Danny & I are both included in the new lit anthology,
FROM SOMEWHERE TO NOWHERE: THE END OF THE AMERICAN DREAM (Autonomedia, Oct 2017)

https://www.akpress.org/from-somewhere-to-nowhere.html

I hope to have some copies of this powerhouse anthology at the reading as well!

Ciao,

Karen

9PM in Kansas City…

Poetic Underground presents: Poetry Open Mic, hosted by Kati Clair and Madison Mae Parker.

Sign-up list opens at 9:00pm, show starts promptly at 9:30pm. Names are read in random order.

Please come share your poetry or prose with us at Poetic Underground. You are allowed up to 5 minutes on the stage and are welcome to share your truth in that time. Please be respectful of those on stage, for the stage is a sacred and safe space.

No cover.

‘Poetic Underground is dedicated to using poetry as a healing and community building tool to create a safe space where artists can gather in Kansas City.’

Please invite your friends, like our Facebook page, Poetic Underground, and take a look at our website poeticunderground.com.

ABOUT THE FEATURE:
Jason Baldinger is a poet hailing from Pittsburgh. He’s the author of several books the most recent of which, the chaplet, Fumbles Revelations (Grackle and Crow) is available now, and the collection Fragments of a Rainy Season (Six Gallery Press) which is coming spring 2018. Recent publications include the Low Ghost Anthology Unconditional Surrender, Uppagus, Lilliput Review, Rusty Truck, Dirtbag Review, In Between Hangovers, Your One Phone Call, Winedrunk Sidewalk, Anti-Heroin Chic, Nerve Cowboy Concrete Meat Press, Zombie Logic Press, Ramingo’s Porch, Blue Mountain Review, Red Fez and Heartland! Poetry of Love, Solidarity and Resistance. You can hear Jason read some poems on recent and forthcoming releases by Theremonster and Sub Pop Recording artist The Gotobeds as well as at jasonbaldinger.bandcamp.com

4/6 Poetry Reading: James, Silsbe, Tutolo, & Wentworth @ White Whale

Posted in Events with tags , , , , , on April 2, 2018 by 6GPress

7PM FRIDAY…

Free. BYOB. Three local poets welcome Mike James back into town for a night of poems at White Whale. Readers bios:

Mike James has been published in more than 100 magazines throughout the country. His work has appeared in such places as Negative Capability, Birmingham Poetry Review, Soundings East, and Chiron Review. He is the author of eleven poetry collections. His most recent books include: Crows in the Jukebox (Bottom Dog), My Favorite Houseguest (FutureCycle), and Peddler’s Blues (Main Street Rag.) He has served as an associate editor for the Kentucky Review and Autumn House Press, as well as the publisher of the now defunct Yellow Pepper Press. His work has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and for the Paterson Prize. He makes his home in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. More information can be found on his website at mike.jamespoetry.com.

Scott Silsbe was born in Detroit. He now lives in Pittsburgh. Silsbe is an editor at Low Ghost Press and has written three books of poetry—’Unattended Fire,’ ‘The River Underneath the City,’ and last year’s ‘Muskrat Friday Dinner.’ His next book, ‘Mount Trashmore,’ is forthcoming from Alien Buddha Press.

Meghan Tutolo is an artist with some writing degrees and two smooshy-faced cats. She romances olives and Italian food for a living and teaches composition at a local college. When she isn’t writing or grading, Meghan can be found painting, doodling, watching ‘Forensic Files,’ drinking too much coffee, playing her guitar or stalking cats on Instagram—sometimes all of these in the same night.

Don Wentworth is a Pittsburgh-based poet whose work reflects his interest in the revelatory nature of brief, haiku-like moments in everyday life. His poetry has appeared in Modern Haiku, bottle rockets, Frogpond and Rolling Stone, as well as a number of anthologies. He is the author of 3 full-length poetry collections published by Six Gallery Press: Past All Traps (2011), Yield to the Willow (2014), and With a Deepening Presence (2016) His first full-length collection, Past All Traps, was shortlisted for the Haiku Foundation’s 2011 Touchstone Distinguished Books Award. His poem “hiding” was selected as one of “100 Notable Haiku” of 2013 by Modern Haiku Press.

Don says,

I will be reading new ghazals from the manuscript currently at the publisher. Who knows, a new haiku or two might pop up, too.
& I’d add that the publisher in question is none other than good ol’ Low Ghost Press. Stay tuned.

12/17 Viva Arletty! & Arkansas Ghoulash launch @ White Whale + Bah Humbug 4 @ Brillobox

Posted in Events, Interviews, New Releases with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 7, 2017 by 6GPress

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 17…

Two new books & two readings! The Ghost of Literature Present will pay a terrifying visit today!

6PM at White Whale in Bloomfield, welcome two writers from Arkansas to Pittsburgh (& welcome their books to your noodle by buying & reading them, too). Free readings & refreshments, possibly including actual goulash.

Scotty Lewis, a 2015 graduate of the Arkansas Writers MFA Program, is debuting his first book of poetry, Arkansas Ghoulash.

Here’s an interview w/ Scotty talking about the book, & here’s another one.

Mark Spitzer, novelist, poet, essayist and literary translator, grew up in Minneapolis where he earned his Bachelor’s degree at the University of Minnesota in 1990. He then moved to the Rockies, where he earned his Master’s in Creative Writing from the University of Colorado. After living on the road for some time, he found himself in Paris, as Writer in Residence for three years at the bohemian bookstore Shakespeare and Company, where he translated French criminals and misanthropes. In 1997 he moved to Louisiana, became Assistant Editor of the legendary lit journal Exquisite Corpse, and earned an MFA from Louisiana State University. He taught creative writing and lit for five years at Truman State University and is now an associate professor of creative writing at the University of Central Arkansas.

Alan Olifson is an award-winning humor columnist, public radio commentator, comedian and regular host of Pittsburgh’s monthly Moth StorySLAMs. He created the acclaimed storytelling series WordPlay in his hometown of Los Angeles which he now produces in Pittsburgh along with Bricolage Production Company as part of their regular season. He’s hosted storytelling events for conferences, schools and, believe it or not, bridal showers. His book, Manchild: My Life Without Adult Supervision, is now out on Six Gallery Press. Alan relocated to Pittsburgh with his wife and two children years ago but never tires of hearing people complain about “traffic.”

Angele Ellis is the author of Arab on Radar (Six Gallery), Spared (A Main Street Rag Editors’ Choice Chapbook), Under the Kaufmann’s Clock: Fiction, Poems, and Photographs of Pittsburgh with photos by Rebecca Clever (Six Gallery), and co-author of the diversity workbook Dealing With Differences (Corwin). A 2008 recipient of an Individual Creative Artist fellowship in poetry from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, she was a prizewinner in the 2007 RAWI Competition for Creative Prose and first runner-up in the 2012 Grey Sparrow Flash Fiction Contest. Angele’s reviews, poetry, and fiction have appeared in nearly sixty publications and fourteen anthologies. She is a contributing editor to Al Jadid Magazine.

John Thomas Menesini is the author of The Last Great Glass Meat Million (Six Gallery Press, 2003), e pit ap h (Convergence, 2007), endo: Poems & Sketches 2007 – 2011 (Six Gallery Press, 2011), and Gloom Hearts & Opioids (Six Gallery Press, 2015). His poems have appeared in numerous publications in Ireland, Scotland, England, and the US, thus garnering dozens of fans across the globe.

Rick Claypool grew up in a small town in western Pennsylvania called Leechburg, but he currently lives in Pittsburgh. By day he works for Public Citizen, a nonprofit organization that fights corporate power. Leech Girl Lives (Spaceboy Books, 2017) is his first novel.

At 8PM, head over to Brillobox for Bah Humbug 4: Writers (Still) Wrestle the Holiday Spirit…

Tastier than a fruitcake, easier to assemble than a Fisher Price playhouse, for the FOURTH year in a row, we are bringing some of Pittsburgh’s finest writers together to entertain you with tales of their holiday work experiences.

$5 suggested donation, proceeds benefit the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank.

The readers will channel their inner-Sedaris, and offer up tales from their time as food service employees, retail workers, and other assorted time-card punchers during the bleak months of November and December. They will attempt to locate their hoilday spirit. Or THE holiday spirits (aka, Jim, Jack and maybe even Johnny).

Just like signing the group birthday card or buying overpriced crap from your co-worker’s kid’s school fundraiser, UGLY HOLIDAY SWEATERS STRONGLY ENCOURAGED.

Hosted by Jason Baldinger (who was once run over by a Black Friday crowd on a rampage for office supplies), and Stephanie Brea (who probably stole that art book she gave you for Christmas in 2001).

The Lineup:

Becky Corrigan
Angele Ellis
Rich Gegick
Lori Jakiela
Andrea Laurion
Deesha Philyaw
Meghan Tutolo
Matt Ussia
Bob Walicki

12/3 Pittsburgh’s 5th Annual Holiday Book Sale @ Stephen Foster Community Center

Posted in Events with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 30, 2017 by 6GPress

THIS SUNDAY…

Join us for Pittsburgh’s FIFTH Annual Holiday Book Sale, featuring Pittsburgh’s favorite indie book vendors. Come browse a wide variety of books from Pittsburgh’s knowledgeable literary curators. Both new and gently used, indie bestsellers and one of a kind finds, local authors and spectacular sales. Fiction, poetry, mysteries, creative nonfiction, art books, children’s books, graphic novels, and much more.

Confirmed vendors thus far:
Air & Nothingness Press (gorgeous letterpress poetry, science fiction, fantasy books, & literature in translation!)
Amazing Books (going strong with three locations!)
Autumn House Press (publishing poetry & literary fiction for almost 20 years!)
Book ‘Em (selling books to raise money for Pittsburgh’s own Books to Prisoners program!)
Copacetic Comics (they’ll have a special selection of new books with an emphasis on SALES!)
Karen Antonelli (artist and maker of beautiful blank books!)
Karen’s Book Row (aka Small Press Pittsburgh) (Featuring the local, the beloved, and the unique in indie lit!)
Mystery Lovers Bookshop (celebrating 27 years in business!)
White Whale Bookstore (celebrating their 2nd year in Bloomfield!)

Sunday, December 3th
12-5pm
Stephen Foster Community Center
Main Street in Lawrenceville–between Butler St and Penn Ave
Free admission
Free parking lot

When The Wizard of Oz Breaks Out into a Gun Battle: An Interview with Scotty Lewis, Author of Arkansas Ghoulash

Posted in Events, Interviews, New Releases with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 28, 2017 by 6GPress

Mark Spitzer says,

Hey, my grad students in poetry just did a kick-ass interview with Scotty on his book.

& here it is. Mark & Scotty will read from their new books Sunday, December 17th at White Whale Bookstore in Bloomfield, along with locals Alan Olifson, Angele Ellis, John Menesini, & Rick Claypool.

When The Wizard of Oz Breaks Out into a Gun Battle:

An Interview with Scotty Lewis, Author of Arkansas Ghoulash

By Drew Cook, Énbarr Coleman, Callie Smith, Briget Laskowski, JJ McNiece, and Mikayla Davis

 

Scotty Lewis, a lecturer in Writing at the University of Central Arkansas, was recently featured at the Faulkner County Library in Conway for a “Debut-Break-Out-Book-Readin-Book-Signin Bonanza.” Hot off the press from Six Gallery Press in Pittsburgh, Arkansas Ghoulash is his first book, and it wasn’t an easy story to tell. On one hand, the narrative revolves around a tragic act of domestic violence; but on the other, it is a daring and complex epic poem in the postmodern tradition that relies on lyrical flashes from a highly unnatural “natural state.” After a dramatic reading that blew his audience away, Lewis responded to questions—an opportunity that graduate students in Creative Writing from the Arkansas Writers MFA Workshop conveniently exploited:

Drew Cook: One of things you do in Arkansas Ghoulash is you take established forms and then you kind of collage them together so they’re not visually recognizable and all that’s left is the music. It’s really a high Modernist approach. I’m interested in how you arrived at that strategy, and if there were any difficulties and advantages in doing so.

Scotty Lewis: There are a lot of things that make poetry good or bad but one of the key things is music. Do I like improvisation? Of course. We like jazz but we also like form. The best improvisation realizes that there’s form, and it breaks it. The best improvisation realizes form. In a way this caused major difficulties because I might have preferred a straight narrative, but I don’t know if it would have worked that way. Emotionally, it was hard for me to do even as abstract as it is. If I turned this into a very straightforward story, I don’t know that I could have done it. Playing with the music of it, playing with the feeling of it, being able to be lyrical in different ways… it helped me capture the feel of it.

Énbarr Coleman: What stuck out most to me was the mention of the Berlin Wall because I noticed that you had a lot of these violent images, a lot of nature, and also soft and gentle stuff. Then suddenly you’ve got the Berlin Wall and things of that nature thrown in. In my opinion, it went from this very local poem to much grander, much more international. I was curious to hear your thoughts on that.

Lewis: There were several markers. The Berlin Wall is in there. Tiananmen Square is in there. There are a few big events of the time that were in there. If you go through the book, there are about seven or eight of those in there. Part of those are to mark time. This is the era that we’re talking about. This is the time we’re talking about. This poem jumps around a lot. Even tonight—and I didn’t want to stop and indicate necessarily because it would have broken up the rhythm of it—but there are places in the part I read tonight that weren’t necessarily sticking to one timeline. Those markers were put in there to anchor the reader in a certain time. They were also in there not only to give a sense of the violence that was taking place and erupting in my household, but also that was erupting around the world. The two things may not be related really, but they seem related. I mean, I grew up in the 1980s, so I certainly didn’t grow up with a cell phone, but I did grow up with a television. I did grow up with a Commodore 64. I grew up with enough technology to always be in touch with what was going on in the world. So I don’t think there is such a thing as living a completely local life anymore.

Callie Smith: The epic form of Arkansas Ghoulash is unusual in contemporary poetry—you don’t see that much. How did you decide on writing in this epic form? What were the challenges and what did it buy you?

Lewis: That’s such an interesting question. While it is the length of an epic, I think I really fell short on a lot of the other elements, but I did sort of want to include some aspects of the epic while writing it. I do think, in a sense, there is a journey to the underworld and an attempt, at least, to come back. So what inspired me to do that? I don’t know, but my favorite epic poem is The Odyssey, which I refer to in the poem. And I knew I wasn’t going to be able to do it in short form. I didn’t want to do it as necessarily sixty poems about the same event. I thought it needed space to grow . . . But I was also keeping a lot of different forms in mind. Within the text, there are places where sonnets, blank verse, where American haiku is hidden—where a lot of smaller forms are actually talking back and forth to each other.

JJ McNiece: I felt a hyperpolarization with your imagery as you read. On one end: brutal, severe violence. On the other: soft, sweet calm. It seemed that the beginning displayed more of the brutal imagery, while the images during the violent event itself were often softer, though interspersed with the brutal. At the end, I felt the imagery gravitated almost exclusively toward that sweet, softer side. I’m curious what your conscious decisions are with imagery and language as you’re going through this? What are you trying to accomplish?

Lewis: I was trying to accomplish a balance. If this is going to be genuine, I don’t think I can gloss over the violence. This was a very violent incident. So, even the things surrounding it, even the consciousness of the narrator while he looks into other things—simple things—notices violence more, even in the landscape. I hope, too, that there are softer parts. I don’t know that I made a conscious decision to polarize those things, but both exist. Do I decide to make softer images? I do, but I don’t know that I think about it that much. I try to make a pretty image now and then. I like to make images. I think it’s a stronger suit of my poetry.

Briget Laskowski: My question deals with images, particularly the images you have on page 63 and 64 where you use the Tin Man image. In fact you even take his words, “Just because I’m presumin’ / That I could be a human / If I only had a heart,” and then on page 64 you have Mickey Mouse, Goofy, and Donald Duck. What were you attempting to communicate using these images?

Lewis: Those were domestic images. I wanted to make sure people understood what those images were about. It was very close, very in the home. It was The Wizard of Oz breaking out into a gunfight. It was Loony Tunes in a certain sense. I was fifteen years old. I was really just crawling into adolescence . . . I felt like a child. So I wanted to make sure that things we associated with children like Mickey Mouse and The Wizard of Oz were there. Another reason for The Wizard of Oz specifically, was the year this happened my brother was extremely talented, very handsome, and he was beginning his acting career, and his acting career launched off partially from his acting in plays at our school. Probably his biggest role was as the Tin Man in The Wizard of Oz. Actually, in the yearbook for the next year there was a full page spread of my brother as the Tin Man.

Mikayla Davis: Many of your poems use natural imagery juxtaposed with very human, sometimes even mechanical imagery, so I was wondering what purpose you see that relationship playing in your poems? And what is humanity’s position in relationship with nature, for you?

Lewis: I think we’re way past being romantics about it. I think that would be disingenuous. I think that would be a lie. I love nature. I love going out. I love to fish, I love to hike. Those of you who know me know I love to be outside, but I always see it diminishing. I don’t really see our efforts to fight it as being very good or even very genuine. I mean, we’re part of nature, right? And so anything we see, if there are mechanical images mixed in with the natural—what we make is as much a part of nature as an ant making an anthill or beaver making a beaver dam. It might be more complicated in the way we do it, but we’re part of nature. We’re just one of those things in nature that really knows how to screw things up. We’re like termites. We’re going to keep eating at the tree until we kill it.

8/26 Salsa Night at Hilo Town Tavern Book Launch @ White Whale Books + Five Writers @ Nine Stories

Posted in Events, Recent Publications with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 17, 2017 by 6GPress

7PM SATURDAY, AUGUST 26…

Celebrate the publication of Kristofer Collins’ new poetry collection ‘Salsa Night at Hilo Town Tavern’ by Hyacinth Girl Press! Featuring readings by Chelsea Bodnar, Deesha Philyaw, Bart Solarczyk, and Kristofer Collins.

This is a FREE event. BYOB.

Chelsea Bodnar once transcribed her favorite horror movie word-for-word.

Kristofer Collins is the publisher and senior editor of Low Ghost Press. He is the books editor for Pittsburgh Magazine and a frequent contributor to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. His latest poetry collection, Salsa Night at Hilo Town Tavern was published by Hyacinth Girl Press in 2017. He lives in Pittsburgh, PA with his wife Dr. Anna Johnson and their two cats.

Deesha Philyaw is the co-author of Co-Parenting 101: Helping Your Kids Thrive in Two Households After Divorce, written in collaboration with her ex-husband. Her writing has appeared in numerous outlets including The New York Times, The Washington Post, Full Grown People, Apogee Journal, brevity, and Dead Housekeeping. Deesha’s work includes a Notable Essay in The Best American Essays 2016. At The Rumpus, Deesha inaugurated and curates a monthly interview column called VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color.

Bart Solarczyk grew up on Pittsburgh’s Southside & now lives in Ross Township. His poems have recently appeared in Lilliput Review, Big Hammer, Rasputin & Nixes Mate Review. His latest chapbook, Right Direction, was published in November of 2016 as one of Lilliput Review’s Modest Proposal series.

ALSO 7PM SATURDAY, AUGUST 26…

Join us for a memorable evening of words!

Scott Silsbe, Gretchen Uhrinek, Sarah Shotland, B. Diehl, & Kat Giordano are excited to share their writing with you.

Free event. BYOB. ♥

6/23 Reading: Gwin, Silsbe, Collins, Garrison @ White Whale Books

Posted in Events with tags , , , , on June 22, 2017 by 6GPress

FRIDAY…

my strong suspicion is it’s these guys reading: Ben Gwin, Scott Silsbe, Kris Collins, & Kurt Garrison. Bring beer & find out!

4/29 Pittsburgh Poetry Review Issue 5 Release Party @ White Whale Books

Posted in Events with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 27, 2017 by 6GPress

SATURDAY…

Come help us celebrate the release of Issue 5, with readings from Daniela Buccili, Ava C. Cipri, George David Clark, Angele Ellis, Mike Good, Kara Knickerbocker, Deena November, Zana Previti, and Vivian Wagner.

The event will begin with an informal social hour at 6 PM, with readings beginning promptly at 7. Beer, wine, and snacks will be provided. Copies and subscriptions of the Review will available for sale.

3/3 Horrible Backbone release feat. Jason Baldinger @ White Whale Bookstore

Posted in Events with tags , , , , , , , on March 1, 2017 by 6GPress

7PM THIS FRIDAY…

Guitarists Erik Cirelli and David Bernabo are releasing a duo guitar record called HORRIBLE BACKBONE. This is the 13th release on the Ongoing Box imprint.

Erik and Dave will close the night with a set of duo guitar pieces. Prior to that are these awesome folks!

Jason Baldinger (reading)
S.E. Smith (reading)
Matt Aelmore (solo bass solo)

7pm. All donations will be donated in full to Southern Poverty Law Center, because they are doing good things.