Archive for White Whale Bookstore

12/17 Viva Arletty! & Arkansas Ghoulash launch @ White Whale + Bah Humbug 4 @ Brillobox

Posted in Events, Interviews, New Releases with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 7, 2017 by 6GPress

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 17…

Two new books & two readings! The Ghost of Literature Present will pay a terrifying visit today!

6PM at White Whale in Bloomfield, welcome two writers from Arkansas to Pittsburgh (& welcome their books to your noodle by buying & reading them, too). Free readings & refreshments, possibly including actual goulash.

Scotty Lewis, a 2015 graduate of the Arkansas Writers MFA Program, is debuting his first book of poetry, Arkansas Ghoulash.

Here’s an interview w/ Scotty talking about the book, & here’s another one.

Mark Spitzer, novelist, poet, essayist and literary translator, grew up in Minneapolis where he earned his Bachelor’s degree at the University of Minnesota in 1990. He then moved to the Rockies, where he earned his Master’s in Creative Writing from the University of Colorado. After living on the road for some time, he found himself in Paris, as Writer in Residence for three years at the bohemian bookstore Shakespeare and Company, where he translated French criminals and misanthropes. In 1997 he moved to Louisiana, became Assistant Editor of the legendary lit journal Exquisite Corpse, and earned an MFA from Louisiana State University. He taught creative writing and lit for five years at Truman State University and is now an associate professor of creative writing at the University of Central Arkansas.

Alan Olifson is an award-winning humor columnist, public radio commentator, comedian and regular host of Pittsburgh’s monthly Moth StorySLAMs. He created the acclaimed storytelling series WordPlay in his hometown of Los Angeles which he now produces in Pittsburgh along with Bricolage Production Company as part of their regular season. He’s hosted storytelling events for conferences, schools and, believe it or not, bridal showers. His book, Manchild: My Life Without Adult Supervision, is now out on Six Gallery Press. Alan relocated to Pittsburgh with his wife and two children years ago but never tires of hearing people complain about “traffic.”

Angele Ellis is the author of Arab on Radar (Six Gallery), Spared (A Main Street Rag Editors’ Choice Chapbook), Under the Kaufmann’s Clock: Fiction, Poems, and Photographs of Pittsburgh with photos by Rebecca Clever (Six Gallery), and co-author of the diversity workbook Dealing With Differences (Corwin). A 2008 recipient of an Individual Creative Artist fellowship in poetry from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, she was a prizewinner in the 2007 RAWI Competition for Creative Prose and first runner-up in the 2012 Grey Sparrow Flash Fiction Contest. Angele’s reviews, poetry, and fiction have appeared in nearly sixty publications and fourteen anthologies. She is a contributing editor to Al Jadid Magazine.

John Thomas Menesini is the author of The Last Great Glass Meat Million (Six Gallery Press, 2003), e pit ap h (Convergence, 2007), endo: Poems & Sketches 2007 – 2011 (Six Gallery Press, 2011), and Gloom Hearts & Opioids (Six Gallery Press, 2015). His poems have appeared in numerous publications in Ireland, Scotland, England, and the US, thus garnering dozens of fans across the globe.

Rick Claypool grew up in a small town in western Pennsylvania called Leechburg, but he currently lives in Pittsburgh. By day he works for Public Citizen, a nonprofit organization that fights corporate power. Leech Girl Lives (Spaceboy Books, 2017) is his first novel.

At 8PM, head over to Brillobox for Bah Humbug 4: Writers (Still) Wrestle the Holiday Spirit…

Tastier than a fruitcake, easier to assemble than a Fisher Price playhouse, for the FOURTH year in a row, we are bringing some of Pittsburgh’s finest writers together to entertain you with tales of their holiday work experiences.

$5 suggested donation, proceeds benefit the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank.

The readers will channel their inner-Sedaris, and offer up tales from their time as food service employees, retail workers, and other assorted time-card punchers during the bleak months of November and December. They will attempt to locate their hoilday spirit. Or THE holiday spirits (aka, Jim, Jack and maybe even Johnny).

Just like signing the group birthday card or buying overpriced crap from your co-worker’s kid’s school fundraiser, UGLY HOLIDAY SWEATERS STRONGLY ENCOURAGED.

Hosted by Jason Baldinger (who was once run over by a Black Friday crowd on a rampage for office supplies), and Stephanie Brea (who probably stole that art book she gave you for Christmas in 2001).

The Lineup:

Becky Corrigan
Angele Ellis
Rich Gegick
Lori Jakiela
Andrea Laurion
Deesha Philyaw
Meghan Tutolo
Matt Ussia
Bob Walicki

12/3 Pittsburgh’s 5th Annual Holiday Book Sale @ Stephen Foster Community Center

Posted in Events with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 30, 2017 by 6GPress

THIS SUNDAY…

Join us for Pittsburgh’s FIFTH Annual Holiday Book Sale, featuring Pittsburgh’s favorite indie book vendors. Come browse a wide variety of books from Pittsburgh’s knowledgeable literary curators. Both new and gently used, indie bestsellers and one of a kind finds, local authors and spectacular sales. Fiction, poetry, mysteries, creative nonfiction, art books, children’s books, graphic novels, and much more.

Confirmed vendors thus far:
Air & Nothingness Press (gorgeous letterpress poetry, science fiction, fantasy books, & literature in translation!)
Amazing Books (going strong with three locations!)
Autumn House Press (publishing poetry & literary fiction for almost 20 years!)
Book ‘Em (selling books to raise money for Pittsburgh’s own Books to Prisoners program!)
Copacetic Comics (they’ll have a special selection of new books with an emphasis on SALES!)
Karen Antonelli (artist and maker of beautiful blank books!)
Karen’s Book Row (aka Small Press Pittsburgh) (Featuring the local, the beloved, and the unique in indie lit!)
Mystery Lovers Bookshop (celebrating 27 years in business!)
White Whale Bookstore (celebrating their 2nd year in Bloomfield!)

Sunday, December 3th
12-5pm
Stephen Foster Community Center
Main Street in Lawrenceville–between Butler St and Penn Ave
Free admission
Free parking lot

When The Wizard of Oz Breaks Out into a Gun Battle: An Interview with Scotty Lewis, Author of Arkansas Ghoulash

Posted in Events, Interviews, New Releases with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 28, 2017 by 6GPress

Mark Spitzer says,

Hey, my grad students in poetry just did a kick-ass interview with Scotty on his book.

& here it is. Mark & Scotty will read from their new books Sunday, December 17th at White Whale Bookstore in Bloomfield, along with locals Alan Olifson, Angele Ellis, John Menesini, & Rick Claypool.

When The Wizard of Oz Breaks Out into a Gun Battle:

An Interview with Scotty Lewis, Author of Arkansas Ghoulash

By Drew Cook, Énbarr Coleman, Callie Smith, Briget Laskowski, JJ McNiece, and Mikayla Davis

 

Scotty Lewis, a lecturer in Writing at the University of Central Arkansas, was recently featured at the Faulkner County Library in Conway for a “Debut-Break-Out-Book-Readin-Book-Signin Bonanza.” Hot off the press from Six Gallery Press in Pittsburgh, Arkansas Ghoulash is his first book, and it wasn’t an easy story to tell. On one hand, the narrative revolves around a tragic act of domestic violence; but on the other, it is a daring and complex epic poem in the postmodern tradition that relies on lyrical flashes from a highly unnatural “natural state.” After a dramatic reading that blew his audience away, Lewis responded to questions—an opportunity that graduate students in Creative Writing from the Arkansas Writers MFA Workshop conveniently exploited:

Drew Cook: One of things you do in Arkansas Ghoulash is you take established forms and then you kind of collage them together so they’re not visually recognizable and all that’s left is the music. It’s really a high Modernist approach. I’m interested in how you arrived at that strategy, and if there were any difficulties and advantages in doing so.

Scotty Lewis: There are a lot of things that make poetry good or bad but one of the key things is music. Do I like improvisation? Of course. We like jazz but we also like form. The best improvisation realizes that there’s form, and it breaks it. The best improvisation realizes form. In a way this caused major difficulties because I might have preferred a straight narrative, but I don’t know if it would have worked that way. Emotionally, it was hard for me to do even as abstract as it is. If I turned this into a very straightforward story, I don’t know that I could have done it. Playing with the music of it, playing with the feeling of it, being able to be lyrical in different ways… it helped me capture the feel of it.

Énbarr Coleman: What stuck out most to me was the mention of the Berlin Wall because I noticed that you had a lot of these violent images, a lot of nature, and also soft and gentle stuff. Then suddenly you’ve got the Berlin Wall and things of that nature thrown in. In my opinion, it went from this very local poem to much grander, much more international. I was curious to hear your thoughts on that.

Lewis: There were several markers. The Berlin Wall is in there. Tiananmen Square is in there. There are a few big events of the time that were in there. If you go through the book, there are about seven or eight of those in there. Part of those are to mark time. This is the era that we’re talking about. This is the time we’re talking about. This poem jumps around a lot. Even tonight—and I didn’t want to stop and indicate necessarily because it would have broken up the rhythm of it—but there are places in the part I read tonight that weren’t necessarily sticking to one timeline. Those markers were put in there to anchor the reader in a certain time. They were also in there not only to give a sense of the violence that was taking place and erupting in my household, but also that was erupting around the world. The two things may not be related really, but they seem related. I mean, I grew up in the 1980s, so I certainly didn’t grow up with a cell phone, but I did grow up with a television. I did grow up with a Commodore 64. I grew up with enough technology to always be in touch with what was going on in the world. So I don’t think there is such a thing as living a completely local life anymore.

Callie Smith: The epic form of Arkansas Ghoulash is unusual in contemporary poetry—you don’t see that much. How did you decide on writing in this epic form? What were the challenges and what did it buy you?

Lewis: That’s such an interesting question. While it is the length of an epic, I think I really fell short on a lot of the other elements, but I did sort of want to include some aspects of the epic while writing it. I do think, in a sense, there is a journey to the underworld and an attempt, at least, to come back. So what inspired me to do that? I don’t know, but my favorite epic poem is The Odyssey, which I refer to in the poem. And I knew I wasn’t going to be able to do it in short form. I didn’t want to do it as necessarily sixty poems about the same event. I thought it needed space to grow . . . But I was also keeping a lot of different forms in mind. Within the text, there are places where sonnets, blank verse, where American haiku is hidden—where a lot of smaller forms are actually talking back and forth to each other.

JJ McNiece: I felt a hyperpolarization with your imagery as you read. On one end: brutal, severe violence. On the other: soft, sweet calm. It seemed that the beginning displayed more of the brutal imagery, while the images during the violent event itself were often softer, though interspersed with the brutal. At the end, I felt the imagery gravitated almost exclusively toward that sweet, softer side. I’m curious what your conscious decisions are with imagery and language as you’re going through this? What are you trying to accomplish?

Lewis: I was trying to accomplish a balance. If this is going to be genuine, I don’t think I can gloss over the violence. This was a very violent incident. So, even the things surrounding it, even the consciousness of the narrator while he looks into other things—simple things—notices violence more, even in the landscape. I hope, too, that there are softer parts. I don’t know that I made a conscious decision to polarize those things, but both exist. Do I decide to make softer images? I do, but I don’t know that I think about it that much. I try to make a pretty image now and then. I like to make images. I think it’s a stronger suit of my poetry.

Briget Laskowski: My question deals with images, particularly the images you have on page 63 and 64 where you use the Tin Man image. In fact you even take his words, “Just because I’m presumin’ / That I could be a human / If I only had a heart,” and then on page 64 you have Mickey Mouse, Goofy, and Donald Duck. What were you attempting to communicate using these images?

Lewis: Those were domestic images. I wanted to make sure people understood what those images were about. It was very close, very in the home. It was The Wizard of Oz breaking out into a gunfight. It was Loony Tunes in a certain sense. I was fifteen years old. I was really just crawling into adolescence . . . I felt like a child. So I wanted to make sure that things we associated with children like Mickey Mouse and The Wizard of Oz were there. Another reason for The Wizard of Oz specifically, was the year this happened my brother was extremely talented, very handsome, and he was beginning his acting career, and his acting career launched off partially from his acting in plays at our school. Probably his biggest role was as the Tin Man in The Wizard of Oz. Actually, in the yearbook for the next year there was a full page spread of my brother as the Tin Man.

Mikayla Davis: Many of your poems use natural imagery juxtaposed with very human, sometimes even mechanical imagery, so I was wondering what purpose you see that relationship playing in your poems? And what is humanity’s position in relationship with nature, for you?

Lewis: I think we’re way past being romantics about it. I think that would be disingenuous. I think that would be a lie. I love nature. I love going out. I love to fish, I love to hike. Those of you who know me know I love to be outside, but I always see it diminishing. I don’t really see our efforts to fight it as being very good or even very genuine. I mean, we’re part of nature, right? And so anything we see, if there are mechanical images mixed in with the natural—what we make is as much a part of nature as an ant making an anthill or beaver making a beaver dam. It might be more complicated in the way we do it, but we’re part of nature. We’re just one of those things in nature that really knows how to screw things up. We’re like termites. We’re going to keep eating at the tree until we kill it.

8/26 Salsa Night at Hilo Town Tavern Book Launch @ White Whale Books + Five Writers @ Nine Stories

Posted in Events, Recent Publications with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 17, 2017 by 6GPress

7PM SATURDAY, AUGUST 26…

Celebrate the publication of Kristofer Collins’ new poetry collection ‘Salsa Night at Hilo Town Tavern’ by Hyacinth Girl Press! Featuring readings by Chelsea Bodnar, Deesha Philyaw, Bart Solarczyk, and Kristofer Collins.

This is a FREE event. BYOB.

Chelsea Bodnar once transcribed her favorite horror movie word-for-word.

Kristofer Collins is the publisher and senior editor of Low Ghost Press. He is the books editor for Pittsburgh Magazine and a frequent contributor to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. His latest poetry collection, Salsa Night at Hilo Town Tavern was published by Hyacinth Girl Press in 2017. He lives in Pittsburgh, PA with his wife Dr. Anna Johnson and their two cats.

Deesha Philyaw is the co-author of Co-Parenting 101: Helping Your Kids Thrive in Two Households After Divorce, written in collaboration with her ex-husband. Her writing has appeared in numerous outlets including The New York Times, The Washington Post, Full Grown People, Apogee Journal, brevity, and Dead Housekeeping. Deesha’s work includes a Notable Essay in The Best American Essays 2016. At The Rumpus, Deesha inaugurated and curates a monthly interview column called VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color.

Bart Solarczyk grew up on Pittsburgh’s Southside & now lives in Ross Township. His poems have recently appeared in Lilliput Review, Big Hammer, Rasputin & Nixes Mate Review. His latest chapbook, Right Direction, was published in November of 2016 as one of Lilliput Review’s Modest Proposal series.

ALSO 7PM SATURDAY, AUGUST 26…

Join us for a memorable evening of words!

Scott Silsbe, Gretchen Uhrinek, Sarah Shotland, B. Diehl, & Kat Giordano are excited to share their writing with you.

Free event. BYOB. ♥

6/23 Reading: Gwin, Silsbe, Collins, Garrison @ White Whale Books

Posted in Events with tags , , , , on June 22, 2017 by 6GPress

FRIDAY…

my strong suspicion is it’s these guys reading: Ben Gwin, Scott Silsbe, Kris Collins, & Kurt Garrison. Bring beer & find out!

4/29 Pittsburgh Poetry Review Issue 5 Release Party @ White Whale Books

Posted in Events with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 27, 2017 by 6GPress

SATURDAY…

Come help us celebrate the release of Issue 5, with readings from Daniela Buccili, Ava C. Cipri, George David Clark, Angele Ellis, Mike Good, Kara Knickerbocker, Deena November, Zana Previti, and Vivian Wagner.

The event will begin with an informal social hour at 6 PM, with readings beginning promptly at 7. Beer, wine, and snacks will be provided. Copies and subscriptions of the Review will available for sale.

3/3 Horrible Backbone release feat. Jason Baldinger @ White Whale Bookstore

Posted in Events with tags , , , , , , , on March 1, 2017 by 6GPress

7PM THIS FRIDAY…

Guitarists Erik Cirelli and David Bernabo are releasing a duo guitar record called HORRIBLE BACKBONE. This is the 13th release on the Ongoing Box imprint.

Erik and Dave will close the night with a set of duo guitar pieces. Prior to that are these awesome folks!

Jason Baldinger (reading)
S.E. Smith (reading)
Matt Aelmore (solo bass solo)

7pm. All donations will be donated in full to Southern Poverty Law Center, because they are doing good things.

1/7 ACLU Benefit feat. Baldinger, Brice, Collins, Friend, Lourette, & Ramírez @ White Whale

Posted in Events with tags , , , , , , , on January 2, 2017 by 6GPress

THIS SATURDAY…

Join local poets Kris Collins, Adriana Ramirez, Malcolm Friend, Jason Baldinger, Nicole Lourette, and Charlie Brice for a reading to help raise funds for the ACLU.

For nearly 100 years, the ACLU has been our nation’s guardian of liberty, working in courts, legislatures, and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties that the Constitution and the laws of the United States guarantee everyone in this country.

Whether it’s achieving full equality for LGBT people, establishing new privacy protections for our digital age of widespread government surveillance, ending mass incarceration, or preserving the right to vote or the right to have an abortion, the ACLU takes up the toughest civil liberties cases and issues to defend all people from government abuse and overreach.

With more than 1 million members, activists, and supporters, the ACLU is a nationwide organization that fights tirelessly in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and Washington, D.C., to safeguard everyone’s rights.

BIOS:

Kristofer Collins is the books editor of Pittsburgh magazine and the publisher of Low Ghost Press. He lives in Stanton heights with his wife Dr. Anna Johnson.

Adriana E. Ramírez is a 2015 PEN/Fusion Award-winning nonfiction writer, storyteller, digital maker, and performance poet based in Pittsburgh. She teaches in the English Department at the University of Pittsburgh, co-runs the Steel City Poetry Slam, and co-founded Aster(ix) Journal. Her work has appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books, Guernica, Convolution, HEArt, Apogee, and Nerve.com, as well as on hundreds of stages across the country. Ramirez is the author of two poetry chapbooks, The Swallows (Blue Sketch Press) and Trusting in Imaginary Spaces (Tired Hearts Press); she is also the nonfiction editor of DISMANTLE (Thread Makes Blanket Press).

Nicole Lourette is a poet and event planner from Rochester, NY. She now lives here in Pittsburgh, PA after graduating with her MFA from Chatham University. She travels both for work and her own sanity as often as possible and manages to write, but never finish travel essays years after the fact. Her work has been featured in Pittsburgh Poetry Review, IDK Magazine and Vagabond City Journal.

Charlie Brice is the author of Flashcuts Out of Chaos, published by WordTech Editions (2016), and a card carrying member of the ACLU. His poetry has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and has appeared in The Atlanta Review, Hawaii Review, Chiron Review, The Pittsburgh Poetry Review and elsewhere.

Malcolm Friend is a poet and CantoMundo fellow originally from the Rainier Beach neighborhood of Seattle, Washington. He received his BA from Vanderbilt University, and is an MFA candidate in Creative Writing at the University of Pittsburgh. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in publications including La Respuestamagazine, the Fjords Review’s Black American Edition, Vinyl, Word Riot, The Acentos Review, Connotation Press: An Online Artifact, and Pretty Owl Poetry.

Jason Baldinger has spent a life in odd jobs. He’s traveled the country, and wrote a few books, The latest of which “The Lower 48” (Six Gallery Press) and the chapbook “The Studs Terkel Blues” (Night Ballet Press) are available now. A short list of recent publishing credits include: Uppagus, Anti Heroin Chic, In-between Hangovers, Your One Phone Call and Lilliput Review. You can also hear audio of some poems on the bandcamp website by just typing in his name.

12/4 Pittsburgh’s 4th Annual Holiday Book Sale @ Stephen Foster Community Center

Posted in Events with tags , , , , , , , , , on November 25, 2016 by 6GPress

TOMORROW…

Join us for Pittsburgh’s 4TH ANNUAL HOLIDAY BOOK SALE!

Sunday December 4th
12-5pm
Stephen Foster Community Center
Free admission
Free parking
Confirmed vendors:
Karen’s Book Row/Small Press Pittsburgh
The Copacetic Comics Company
Amazing Books & Records
Mystery Lovers Bookshop
White Whale Bookstore
Book’Em (Pittsburgh’s Books To Prisoners)
More vendors TBA
Hosted by Karen’s Book Row (formerly Small Press Pittsburgh)

10/22 Ellis, Moody, Collins, Baldinger, & Silsbe Conversate & Connect @ Chatham + Poetic License Revoked @ White Whale Bookstore

Posted in Events with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 17, 2016 by 6GPress

THIS SATURDAY…

is Barrelhouse magazine’s Conversations and Connections conference at scenic Chatham University, featuring all sorts of panels & whatnot with actual, real, honest-to-Allah writers, including everyone’s favorite Six Gallery scribblers.

At 10:45 AM is one called Beyond Free Writing: 8 Concrete Suggestions for Jump-starting Your Work:

We’ve all heard it a hundred (thousand) times: when you’re stuck, just put the pen to paper and write. Write about nothing, write about something, write about anything. But what about those times when you’ve (free) written and written, and nothing on the page speaks to you? Or you can’t type “I don’t know what I’m typing I don’t know what I’m typing” one more time? This panel will provide (at least) 8 concrete suggestions to help prose writers and poets springboard into their work. Attendees will walk away with tangible ideas about how to generate new material—and also some nifty handouts to help them along. Writers of any stage will benefit from this panel, but especially those who may still be feeling out their writing practice and deciding what works best for them; also, anyone recently fighting writer’s block will come away armed with some tried to true tactics to get back in the game, maybe from a new angle.

Fiction writer Ashley Kunsa will discuss 3 methods for writers in any genre. These include going back to your old favorites—returning to previous sources of inspiration, be it a beloved writer or individual work, that have energized your writing in the past and using various techniques to encourage them to do so again; going back to your own favorites—finding past work of your own that reminds you of your own great capacity for creativity; and getting curious—using the simple tools around you (e.g., newspaper, smart phone, internet) to seek out new and interesting information to kick your creative brain into gear.

Poet and editor Ava Cipri will share 3 methods of interest to poets, but potentially useful for writers in other genres. “Get moving”: physical movement facilitates creativity; we naturally read work differently standing or walking, and walking affords a space to compose phrases and even the beginnings of a poem through dictation (audio recording) or pen. “Get Inside”: work intimately inside forms in unexpected ways; this can range from the villanelle, recipes, directions, to unfamiliar lexicons, etc. Almost anything can become a container. “Steal that”: practice found poetry by creating new derivative works. Do this through numerous found poetry forms: erasures, mixes, the cento, etc.. All activities aid in generating material with hooks, thus unfreezing the brain.

Angele Ellis, poet, prose writer, and editor, will discuss how to generate drafts of publishable poetry, fiction, and nonfiction, using the methods of Writers’ Playtime, the monthly writing group she has led since 2011. The most important of these methods are the group’s focus on only positive feedback, which provides participants with specific encouragement and direction (including the highlighting of key words and phrases in their drafts), and the development of small group solidarity, which releases creative energy, circumvents writers’ block, and promotes confidence in sharing and refining new work.

Also at 10:45 AM is Poetic License Revoked: Poetry as Non-Fiction:

Plato famously thought poets were immoral, going so far as to banish them from his Republic, because, he claimed, poetry was based in falsehood and therefore immoral. But what the hell did Plato know?

Panelists will discuss various approaches to poetry as a vehicle for non-fiction writing incorporating various genres such as memoir, journalism, travel writing, anthropology, cultural criticism, etc.

We will consider the versatility of the poetic form, as well as the challenges that arise when incorporating what are perceived as non-traditional genres and methods into the practice of poetry composition.

Revoking your poetic license will be Sheila Carter-Jones, Kristofer Collins, Lori Jakiela, Kamala Gopalakrishnan, Jason Baldinger, Scott Silsbe, &, all the way from Texas, our old pal Jonathan Moody.

& if you still have it in you after all that, or didn’t shell out $70 for the conference, there’s a FREE reading of the same name, by the same folks.

The Bloomfield storefront formerly known as East End Book Exchange was recently relaunched as White Whale Bookstore, but new owners Jill and Adlai Yeomans seem intent on continuing the space as a literary hub. For instance, today Chatham University hosts the Conversations and Connections Writers Conference, whose panel talks include Poetic License Revoked: Poetry as Non-Fiction. Tonight, that panel’s seven participants — Jason Baldinger, Sheila L. Carter-Jones, Kristofer Collins, Kamala Gopalakrishnan, Lori Jakiela, Jonathan Moody and Scott Silsbe — reconvene at White Whale to read their poetry. BO 7 p.m. 4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-224-2847 or www.whitewhalebookstore.com

CP Short List

Please conversate & connect responsibly.